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Number of affordable homes may drop

This news post is almost 9 years old
 

Proposals to change Scottish planning policy need clarifying says Shelter Scotland

We are wary of any change to national policy which could result in fewer affordable homes being built

Changes to Scotland’s planning laws could lead to fewer affordable homes being built.

Shelter Scotland says a draft of the Scottish planning policy is worded in such a way that developers could see the 25% build benchmark as being a maximum rather than a minimum.

The proposed wording states: “Affordable housing contributions should generally be no more than 25 percent” of new housing developments.

Shelter wants the wording to be more specific to ensure the 25% benchmark is non-negotiable.

It fears in areas such as Aberdeenshire and Edinburgh, where development land is at a premium, the changes could lead to a reduction in the number of affordable homes being built via developer contributions.

James Battye, policy officer for Shelter Scotland, said: “Against a background of a chronic shortage of housing, we are wary of any change to national policy which could result in fewer affordable homes being built.

“If this change stands, it could threaten the delivery of much needed affordable homes across Scotland.”

The Scottish Government has promised to build at least 30,000 new affordable homes during the lifetime of the current parliament.

The charity is also calling for clearer statistical information on the delivery of affordable housing through the planning system.

 

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