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The voice of Scotland’s vibrant voluntary sector

Published by Scottish Council for Voluntary Organisations

TFN is published by the Scottish Council for Voluntary Organisations, Mansfield Traquair Centre, 15 Mansfield Place, Edinburgh, EH3 6BB. The Scottish Council for Voluntary Organisations (SCVO) is a Scottish Charitable Incorporated Organisation. Registration number SC003558.

Charity Governance Awards reward well run organisations

This news post is almost 7 years old
 

Prizes of £5,000 are available to those that display outstanding governance

Well-run charities can bid for a funding boost.

Now in its third year, the Charity Governance Awards is returning with a prize pot of £35,000 for the UK’s most effective charity boards.

From 5 October, charities of all sizes can enter one of seven categories in the awards which recognise outstanding governance.

Charities from all sectors are in with a chance of winning a £5,000 prize as an unrestricted grant. The judging panel are seeking charity boards who have successfully embraced digital opportunities; boards who have dramatically turned around their fortunes; those that have created inclusive and diverse boards; and those who have significantly improved their impact.

Winners at the 2017 awards included Prisoners’ Education Trust, Voluntary Arts and Asthma UK.

Michael Howell, chair of the trusteeship committee of award organisers The Clothworkers’ Company, said: “Following the July launch of the revised Charity Governance Code and recent all-party House of Lords Report, there is real impetus behind raising the standard of charity governance, particularly in the areas of board diversity, digital innovation and trustee skills.

“In the shadow of high-profile failures, getting governance right – and shining a light on it – has never been more essential for charities.

“Good leadership, integrity and innovation should be rewarded and I urge any charity trustees to consider entering the awards.

“Let’s help put into perspective the negative charity stories which steal the headlines, and show the public the brilliant work that charities across the country are quietly getting on with day after day.”

The awards are free to enter and shortlisted entrants will receive an invitation to the official awards ceremony at London’s Clothworkers Hall on 24 May. For full details and to enter, see the awards website.