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The voice of Scotland’s vibrant voluntary sector

Published by Scottish Council for Voluntary Organisations

TFN is published by the Scottish Council for Voluntary Organisations, Mansfield Traquair Centre, 15 Mansfield Place, Edinburgh, EH3 6BB. The Scottish Council for Voluntary Organisations (SCVO) is a Scottish Charitable Incorporated Organisation. Registration number SC003558.

Charity urges caution as mercury rises

 

Age Scotland has called for people to look out for their elderly family members and neighbours

Age Scotland is asking people to look out for older relatives and friends as the heatwave sweeps the country.

Temperatures are predicted to soar as high as 28 degrees Celsius in the west of Scotland over the next two days.

While sunseekers and staycationers are flocking to the beaches, the charity warned that the hot spell also brings risks.

Older people are more at risk from heatstroke and other health conditions linked to extreme temperatures.  They are being urged to take precautions, including staying hydrated, staying inside during the hottest times of the day, and avoiding over-exertion.

Adam Stachura, Age Scotland’s head of policy, said: “While many of us are enjoying the summer weather, it’s important to remember that it can also bring health risks. As we get older, we are more at risk of heatstroke, heat exhaustion and dehydration.

“It makes sense to take a few precautions, such as wearing sunscreen, drinking plenty of fluids, avoiding strenuous exercise, and staying indoors during the hottest part of the day. Keep your home cool by closing curtains and blinds and opening windows.

“We would urge everyone to check on their older neighbours, friends and relatives, to make sure they are well and see if they need  anything. Something as simple as offering to open a window or bring a cold drink or bottle of sunscreen could make a big difference to someone’s health and well-being.

“Remember to watch out for any warning signs, such as confusion, dizziness, or headaches, which could be symptoms of heatstroke or dehydration, and get medical help if necessary.”

The NHS has more advice on staying well in hot weather.

 

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