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DEC Ukraine appeal hits £100m as charities appeal for cash not goods

 

Fastest growing refugee crisis since second world war

Money rather than goods is being asked for by the Disasters Emergency Committee (DEC) as its Ukraine appeal has now reached more than £100m.

The Ukraine appeal was set up last Thursday by the DEC, which brings together 15 leading UK aid charities at times of crisis overseas.

It thanked everyone who has contributed so far and said the message from aid workers at Ukraine’s borders and inside the invaded nation was that money is needed rather than donated items.

The DEC said: “We are seeing an absolutely incredible response from the public to this appeal, which has now raised over £85m. We are grateful to everyone who is giving, organising events and helping to spread the word.

“Our member charities are at the borders and inside Ukraine responding to the huge and growing humanitarian crisis.

“They are telling us that what they need is funding rather than donated items. The things that people give today might not be what people need tomorrow.”

The donations include £25m contributed by the UK government in match-funding - the largest commitment ever made to a DEC appeal through the UK aid match scheme.

In Scotland, £10m has been raised so far.

Celebrities that have raised awareness about the fundraiser include Trigger Point actor Adrian Lester, Game Of Thrones star Kit Harington, Hot Fuzz actor Simon Pegg, Downton Abbey's Hugh Bonneville and Doctor Who star David Tennant.

The UN said displaced refugees from the country could grow to four million, calling it the fastest-growing refugee crisis since the second world war.


 

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