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The voice of Scotland’s vibrant voluntary sector

Published by Scottish Council for Voluntary Organisations

TFN is published by the Scottish Council for Voluntary Organisations, Mansfield Traquair Centre, 15 Mansfield Place, Edinburgh, EH3 6BB. The Scottish Council for Voluntary Organisations (SCVO) is a Scottish Charitable Incorporated Organisation. Registration number SC003558.

Half of Scots charities have lost fundraising income

This news post is over 1 year old
 

Those reliant on fundraised income have been worst hit by crisis #NeverMoreNeeded

More than half of Scottish charities have lost income from fundraising during the coronavirus pandemic.

Research published by the Office of the Scottish Regulator (OSCR) shows 51% of charities surveyed had their fundraising affected while a 42% had lost income from other sources such as trading.

And one in five (20%) reported a critical threat to their financial viability in the next 12 months

The research was conducted from 5 to 15 May, with 4,827 responses providing insights from a large number of registered Scottish charities.

The survey also asked respondents to submit recommendations to OSCR. The most common recommendation asked us to continue with the current level of support (17%).

Besides that, charities asked for more general support on funding, more flexibility with deadlines/payments and for OSCR to inform them on government guidelines.

Maureen Mallon, OSCR chief executive, said: ‘It is clear that the pandemic has hit many charities hard. Nearly every charity in Scotland reported some form of negative impact from COVID-19 or the lockdown measures.

“Charities have shown passion, skill and expertise in countering this impact as much as they can, but there is a significant proportion that still need support in a number of areas. While the lockdown measures are starting to be lifted, the very serious long-term impact on Scottish charities and the support they provide to beneficiaries is beginning to become clear.

“Many are accessing the wide range of financial and other support and guidance being made available during this time. It will be vital to ensure that this continues to be offered in a thoughtful and targeted way.

“As Scotland’s charity regulator, we are in a privileged position to be able to speak directly to such a large number of charities. We are fully committed to sharing this information widely to support the best outcomes for Scottish charities and their beneficiaries.

“I’d like to thank everyone who participated in the research. These findings will enable us to work with others, including the Scottish Government, on the best ways to support the sector during this time.”

 

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