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Mo Bros and Mo Sistas cash goes to university cancer researchers

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Experts from Heriot-Watt and Glasgow University’s to share £350,000 from Prostate Cancer UK and Movember Foundation

Researchers from two Scottish universities are to share a £350,000 grant to find more answers about prostate cancer.

The Prostate Cancer UK charity is making the money available to experts at Heriot-Watt and Glasgow universities from funds raised for it by the Movember Foundation.

Dr. Nicholas Leslie from Heriot-Watt University has received £300,000 for a three year study on how the loss of a protein called PTEN leads to aggressive prostate cancers.

He said: “Almost half of aggressive prostate cancers develop following the loss of a protein called PTEN. We need to know why. Once we do, it could help us identify harmless from aggressive prostate cancers and speed up the development of drugs to successfully treat the latter.

“I’m delighted to have been given the opportunity to work on this exciting project, and thank Prostate Cancer UK and Movember for the funding allowing it to happen.”

It's through the efforts of 10,000 Mo Bros and Mo Sistas in Scotland, and thousands more across the UK, that we have been able to fund such vital research

Prof. George Baillie from the University of Glasgow has received £50,000 for a one year study to investigate the role of the protein PDE4D7 in the development of prostate cancer. He said: “We know that the amount of a protein called PDE4D7 significantly differs between hormone responsive and hormone unresponsive prostate cancers.

“This protein binds to a number of other proteins. We want to investigate these links and see if we can use this information to develop a new strategy to halt the growth of the cancer cells.

“This will identify potential targets for new treatments for advanced prostate cancer, and funding provided by Prostate Cancer UK and Movember will allow us to take one step closer to this goal.”

The funds were awarded as part of a £2 million wave of Movember Foundation Project Grants and Pilot Awards announced.

Each awardee had to apply via a competitive process and were subject to detailed assessment.

Dr Iain Frame, director of research at Prostate Cancer UK, said all of the projects to receive funding were chosen because of their extremely high quality and relevance to men with prostate cancer.

He said: “Through our ongoing partnership with the Movember Foundation we have been able to fund another bumper round of high quality research grants this year.

“These focus on the key issues facing prostate cancer - from identifying men at risk of developing aggressive forms to discovering new treatments for advanced disease.

Sarah Coghlan, UK country director at The Movember Foundation, added: “It's through the efforts of 10,000 Mo Bros and Mo Sistas in Scotland, and thousands more across the UK, that we have been able to fund such vital research to address the key challenges in prostate cancer.

“With continued support we can do more so that fewer men die from prostate cancer - and those that live can enjoy happier, healthier, longer lives.”

Prostate Cancer UK’s latest funding effort is asking people to get together with their friends this summer to raise funds and take on activities from poker nights to golf, cycling, walking, climbing and even rock festivals.

Find out here how to get involved at prostatecanceruk.org/get-involved.

 

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