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Pandemic sees Scots households create more waste

This news post is 8 months old
 

Every Scot is responsible for 18.4 tonnes of waste materials every year

Household waste in Scotland saw a significant rise during the first lockdown, a report has revealed.

Zero Waste Scotland, the not-for-profit environmental group, said people had to think carefully about what they were consuming and how it would impact the planet.

The amount of waste in Scottish households grew by 3.2% in 2020, rising from 5.66 million tonnes CO2 equivalent, to 5.84 million tonnes CO2 equivalent, according to Zero Waste Scotland.

Its report, which it carried out in collaboration with the Scottish government, measured the impact of waste by its weight, as well as the "whole life" carbon impacts of items, the resources needed, emissions produced in manufacturing and waste management.

It also noted an increase in people's average carbon footprint due to online shopping during the pandemic.

Iain Gulland, chief executive of Zero Waste Scotland, said: "The first year of the pandemic saw us all having to change our way of living almost overnight - this a rise in online shopping, which of course resulted in a spike in household waste.

"Every person in Scotland is responsible for 18.4 tonnes of materials every year and it is these products and materials which make up around 80% of Scotland's carbon footprint.

"If we are serious about ending our contribution to the climate crisis, we must live within our means and reduce our consumption in the first place - there is no time to waste."

 

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