This website uses cookies for anonymised analytics and for account authentication. See our privacy and cookies policies for more information.





The voice of Scotland’s vibrant voluntary sector

Published by Scottish Council for Voluntary Organisations

TFN is published by the Scottish Council for Voluntary Organisations, Mansfield Traquair Centre, 15 Mansfield Place, Edinburgh, EH3 6BB. The Scottish Council for Voluntary Organisations (SCVO) is a Scottish Charitable Incorporated Organisation. Registration number SC003558.

Polling shows Scots want ban on dog racing

This news post is about 1 year old
 

Majority believe breeding dogs for the tracks is cruel

Scots are opposed to greyhound racing, according to new polling by an animal welfare group.

Polling by GREY2K USA Worldwide, the largest greyhound protection charity in the world, shows that six in 10 Scottish people think the Scottish Parliament should vote to phase out greyhound racing, while 63% of respondents said they have an unfavourable view of the sport.

Welfare of racing dogs is among the biggest concerns for the Scottish public with 58% believing dogs bred for the tracks have a bad quality of life.

Further to this, three quarters of the public think dog racing isn’t important to the Scottish economy.

Carey Theil of GREY2K USA Worldwide said: “We know animal welfare is of keen importance to Scots, and these figures firmly cement the view that greyhound racing has had its day.

“Greyhound racing is not just a bit of fun for those who want a harmless flutter at the dogs. It is a gambling-led industry which has absolutely no regard for the welfare of the dogs bred into this life of misery. From cradle to grave racing dogs are exposed to risk and injury, and then tossed aside when they no longer fulfil their use on the track.”

Bob Elliot, director of animal welfare charity OneKind, said the statistics are clear - that the majority of people in Scotland want to see a greyhound racing ban.  

"Time and time again, we’ve seen doping scandals, horrifyingly high numbers of injuries and deaths – over 1,000 dogs killed on the Greyhound Board of Great Britain’s regulated tracks across a five-year period – and the abysmal treatment of raced greyhounds.

“We’ve also heard heart-breaking accounts of traumatised greyhounds during parliamentary debates, and inspirational accounts of the incredible people who rehabilitate them. These dogs are the lucky ones. Others will be killed when they no longer make money for their ‘trainers’.  

"How much more does the Scottish Government need to hear? Greyhound racing is a cruel and outdated ‘sport’ which has no place in a modern Scotland. These sensitive, lazy and loving dogs, affectionately known as ‘couch potatoes’ by their families, deserve so much better. Nothing short of a complete ban on greyhound racing will suffice."

Scotland has just one unregulated, operational track in Thornton, Fife. In May last year, the Scottish Animal Welfare Commission provided the Scottish Parliament’s Rural Affairs, Islands and Natural Environment Committee with an opinion on unregulated tracks in Scotland. The Commission has now formed a working group to undertake more research and consider evidence and will reach a conclusion by the end of February this year.