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The voice of Scotland’s vibrant voluntary sector

Published by Scottish Council for Voluntary Organisations

TFN is published by the Scottish Council for Voluntary Organisations, Mansfield Traquair Centre, 15 Mansfield Place, Edinburgh, EH3 6BB. The Scottish Council for Voluntary Organisations (SCVO) is a Scottish Charitable Incorporated Organisation. Registration number SC003558.

Cross-sector campaign launched to tackle cost of living crisis

 

Enough Is Enough revealed its plans this week with a set of demands to "push back against the misery forced on millions by rising bills, low wages, food poverty, shoddy housing".

A new campaign has launched to tackle the growing inequalities facing workers across the UK backed by food banks, trade unions and politicians. 

Enough Is Enough, unveiled on Monday morning, has been set up to tackle the cost of living crisis in a coordinated fashion, bringing together leading figures from across civic society. 

Fronted by Labour MP Zarah Sultana, trade union leaders Mick Lynch and the RMT and Dave ward of the Communication Workers Union (CWU), the campaign has set out a number of demands it seeks to have met in the coming months. 

Support also comes from Tribune Magazine, ACORN, Fans Supporting Foodbanks and the Right to Food Campaign, as well as Labour MP Ian Byrne. 

Labour MP, Zarah Sultana, said in the launch video: “For a real pay rise, to slash energy bills, to end fuel poverty, for decent homes for all, and to finally tax the rich and big business – this is what Enough Is Enough stands for. 

“It’s all about one political choice – your need or their greed. It’s time to channel anger into action.”

Among them is a call for a real pay rise for those working across the country, as well as a huge cute to rising energy bills which have skyrocketed over the past year. 

https://twitter.com/eiecampaign/status/1556551243765514240?s=20&t=g4612VDjprfii8umTC_oRg

This would include a “significant rise in the national minimum wage and a path to £15 an hour, a real public sector pay rise, and an inflation busting-rise in pensions and benefits”.

Further to this, the campaign would see the October energy price hike cancelled and the significantly lower pre-April price cap restored. 

An end to food poverty is also a key ask for those being Enough Is Enough, through the introduction of universal free school meals, community kitchens, and reinstating the £20-a-week Universal Credit uplift. 

Calls for a cap on rents, the building of at least 100,000 council homes a year, better insulation and the introduction of a charter for renters’ rights make up housing demands. 

Lastly, Enough Is Enough have underlined the need for a crack down on tax avoidance and evasion, as well as taxing the wealthy. 

https://twitter.com/zarahsultana/status/1556595157876838400?s=20&t=g4612VDjprfii8umTC_oRg

The campaign says this can be done by introducing a wealth tax, raising taxes on corporate profits and on the top five per cent of earners, closing tax dodging loopholes and abolishing non-dom status, increasing capital gains tax, and introducing new taxes on speculation.

The popularity of the campaign after its launch saw sign-ups overwhelm their website, forcing it to crash. 

Mr Lynch said: “For 30 years, living standards have been falling in this country. We’ve seen our council housing sold off, our education system commodified, our NHS privatised, work terms and conditions torn up, wages put back and pensions robbed. 

“It doesn’t have to be like this. Things could be so much better for working class people across this country. We need everybody out together, campaigning for a better deal. It’s time to say enough is enough.”

 

Comments

0 0
Steven Cowan
about 2 months ago

Millions will be with this campaign. Me too.

Really important to sort out the home care service for the elderly across the whole of the country. This directly affects millions of people. All such services should be brought under the direction and control of local authorities working in partnership with the NHS.